In order to register your car in the state of Florida, you’re required to show proof of Personal Injury Protection (PIP) and Property Damage Liability auto insurance. The reality is that many of the drivers on the roads here in Florida are underinsured or completely uninsured.

According to a study from the Insurance Research Council, just about one in every five Florida drivers are operating vehicles without an active car insurance policy. So what are your options if you are hit by an uninsured driver in Florida?

A Floridian involved in a motorcycle accident fills out their injury claim form.

The Cliff Notes: Key Takeaways From This Post

  • 1
    According to a study from the Insurance Research Council, one in five Florida drivers do not have active car insurance policies.
  • 2
    In the state of Florida, legal drivers are required to carry Personal Injury Protection (PIP) and property damage coverage as part of their car insurance policies.
  • 3

    PIP can be used to cover 80% of medical expenses related to an accident that meet the criteria for an “emergency medical condition.”

  • 4
    It is important for Florida drivers involved in an accident with an uninsured motorist to file a police report and check their own auto insurance policy for Uninsured Motorist Coverage (UM).
  • 5
    If UM coverage is not present on the driver’s insurance policy, collision coverage may be used to cover damages to the vehicle.
  • 6
    Drivers who were hit by an uninsured driver should also consider speaking with a qualified personal injury attorney as they may be able to negotiate with the at-fault driver’s insurer or press charges depending on the details of the case.

Let’s Review Florida’s No-Fault Car Insurance Laws First

Florida drivers are legally required to carry PIP and property damage coverage as a part of their car insurance policies. This provides a minimum of $10,000 that will be used to cover certain damages/injuries caused by an accident. Florida is a no-fault state, which is why each driver is required to carry their own insurance.

When it comes to the application of PIP, fault won’t be a factor following a car accident. The driver just needs to seek appropriate medical treatment within 14 days of the accident. Otherwise, the PIP insurance carrier could reject an injury claim outright.

Keep in mind that PIP can be used to cover 80% of your medical expenses caused by a car accident (assuming that doesn’t exceed your policy limit). To qualify for PIP coverage, injuries have to be determined to be an “emergency medical condition.” This means that your injuries:

  • Are life-threatening, or
  • Significantly impact normal bodily functions, or
  • Have triggered severe internal organ dysfunction

Remember that this holds true for the at-fault driver as well. Be sure to check out our other resources on PIP in Florida if you’d like to learn more. This is an important topic that impacts any driver in Florida.

Filing a Police Report & Insurance Claim After the Car Accident

Since Florida is a no-fault state, that means you’ll be filing a car accident claim with your own insurance company no matter what. An official police report will help your case, so keep this in mind if the other driver tries to offer money or otherwise handle things privately. Damages and resulting injuries are often worse than they appear initially.

Don’t leave the scene of the car accident and take steps to document whatever details you can while you are waiting for the police to arrive. They’ll take statements from you, the at-fault driver and any witnesses. This documentation will be very important, especially if you end up having to take legal action.

After the police report has been filed in Florida, you should file an uninsured motorist insurance claim with your carrier. If you aren’t sure whether you have uninsured motorist (UM) coverage on your auto insurance policy, now would be a great time to check!

How Uninsured Motorist Coverage Works

If you are hit by a driver that doesn’t have insurance, your PIP coverage will be able to help. But what if the resulting damages exceed your coverage limits? In this scenario, the next best option will be to seek compensation from your own insurance provider. This is possible if you have uninsured motorist coverage on your car insurance policy.

The name should make it clear what this type of coverage does and this post should provide a compelling enough reason to make sure you add it to your auto insurance policy (if you haven’t done that already). Uninsured Motorist coverage isn’t required in the state of Florida, but our personal injury attorneys highly recommend it. This would cover damages your vehicle sustained in the accident and compensate you for injuries if the at-fault driver has no insurance of their own.

A Floridian involved in a motorcycle accident fills out their injury claim form.